Inflation. Yes, again.

Note: I had written a whole play-by-play analysis of this section (pages 366-373) of Basic Economics by Thomas Sowell, but it is so boring and long I’ve decided it isn’t worth being put on a blog. 

We are going to whittle this down drastically and not trouble ourselves with all the different ways Sowell errs on inflation. I’ll try to simply give an explanation of what inflation is while keeping his errors in mind. There will be coverage of this section of Basic Economics in more detail in an eventual upcoming e-book and you can join The Mean Austrian email list for updates on that.

So, let’s get down to it: (Pry those eyelids open and try to not run away. It may sound familiar, but I promise it’s – relatively -short.) 

– The Mean Austrian

 

Scarcity is one of the key features of money and an important feature to keep inflation from drastically hitting an economy. When government has control over the money supply, and that money supply is paper backed by nothing of true worth – as the U.S. currency is today – there is nothing to stop the government from printing out more money. And more money. And more money still. This inflates the money supply (i.e., inflation).

The result is that as more gold comes on the market, it is valued less. The more there is of something the less it is worth. On the flip side, generally speaking, the less there is of something the more valuable it becomes. This is true of everything from bread to baseball cards. Pretty basic stuff.

“Hold up, Mean Austrian! Might gold ever be affected by inflation?”

Yes, inflation can happen even with gold. Enter, History:

After the New World was discovered by Europeans, gold mines in America were opened and gold flowed back to the old country where this new money bid up the price of goods. But it was very minimal and happened gradually over the course of a century.

The difference between gold mines in the New World and printing presses in the U.S. is that to mine gold out of the ground and ship it across the Atlantic was a costly and risky venture. It took a lot of tangible resources to bring that gold into circulation and thus the inflation was limited by the pocketbooks of the entrepreneurs and their backers. Under the Federal Reserve, there is nothing limiting the the increase in money. It is little more than a matter of paper and ink. No risk, high “reward”.

While there can be inflation with gold-based currency, that inflation would never be runaway inflation. The only thing keeping us from experiencing the runaway inflation the Wiemar Republic went through, and that Venezuela is currently experiencing, is the relative good sense of Janet Yellen.

WHY GOVERNMENTS CAUSE INFLATION

Governments, in some sense, ultimately rest upon the acquiescence of the people. If the taxes get too high, people become unruly. The solution then is to tax as much as you can get away with, and for whatever expenditures remain unmet, simply print the money.

Yes, you guessed it: This inflates the money supply! It devalues the money already in circulation and it steals the purchasing power of every consumer in the country. This is a hidden tax and the most regressive tax. A sales tax may be at 8% of every dollar a poor man spends, but inflation takes 2% of every dollar the poor man doesn’t spend every year. This flat-out discourages saving money and if the man wishes to improve his current financial situation it makes it all the harder.

I’m pretty sure we’ll deal with other aspects of inflation as we move forward.  Deflation is right around the corner, so I’ll leave it here for now… I wouldn’t want to overexcite anyone all in one post.

I should also apologize for the delay. Blame my cows and computer. I know I do. For those of you who are still following along despite the delay, I really do appreciate you!

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